About your Search

20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
followed as well. mike barnicle, it was pete williams who went against every instinct in this 24/7 news culture where people seem far more interested in getting it first than getting it right. it was pete williams who kept saying that information is incorrect. and he acted like a news reporter is supposed to act. he actually waited until he got the information and passed it on to everyone else. not an especially good day for journalism yesterday with news outlets messing up on an issue this important to the american people because they are just interested in speed instead of accuracy. >> yeah. i know. it wasn't a good day, joe, for this business. the pressures, of course, are enormous today. the pressures to get things first is e nermnormous, we know. it's now a first, let's get it first! look. we all make mistakes in this business, in every business. i probably lead the league in mistakes in terms of getting things into newspapers and what have you. but the larger issue here is what is going on in the back bay about six blocks from where we sit now out in front of the holy cross cathed
to the media-generated chaos. joining us now, pete williams, who i should tell you, is in the same building i am in but is at another camera because he needs to be close to his desk phone. it truly is that kind of day in the news, pete. thank you very much for being here. >> you bet. >> what do we know about what authorities have been able to find from combing through the pictures and videos in the two days since the bombing? >> well, i think you've summarized it well. the holy grail for them was to see someone setting down a heavy backpack or duffel bag, a black nylon bag, that they believe this relatively heavy bomb was carried in. they think it weighed about 20 pounds, setting it down at the scene of one or the other of the bombings, and then getting away. they believe they have found a picture like that, first from the store surveillance camera that you noted, but they since have been able to triangulate that or get other views of it from other pictures and recordings that people who are in the area have sent them. people who have sent them pictures not knowing what exactly was to be foun
done in the right way. >> nbc news correspondent pete williams has an update. what are you hearing regarding this video? >> video and still pictures is my understanding, tamron. >> yeah. >> we may see them today, we may not. this is kind of a back-and-forth thing. it seems, i guess, likely at this point that we will. and it should be clear if they do show these pictures today, these are the people they're most interested in talking to. you know, i don't think anyone at this point is saying the fbi has quote/unquote, found the bombers. they see the faces but they don't know who they are and if they show them publicly, they're going to be asking for public help to identify them so they can find them, talk to them and figure out what was going on there. it's always a difficult job to balance this, tamron, because on one hand the agented would prefer, i'm sure, to conduct this investigation on their own with a lot of tips that will turn out to be wrong but at the same time the longer they way, the more these people would get away or much worse try to do it again. there's competing pres
." the latest on the boston investigation from the governor of massachusetts, deval patrick and pete williams and our roundtable all coming up on "meet the press." >> david, thanks very much. >>> that's going to do it for us on a sunday morning. thanks, everybody, for watching. i'll see you back here tonight for ""nbc nightly news."" have a great day, everybody. for ""nbc nightly news."" have a great day, everybody. so long. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com in the bay, the latest on the boston marathon bombings, and how the newest release of the suspect helped to bring to a close the massive manhunt. and the search for answers in the attacks sparks a heated debate about the suspect and his rights. >> psychological, some kind of wayward nut like columbine or some of the school shooters have appare apparently been. >> a bay area terrorism expert speaks with us about the questions that investigators are most likely to pose to suspect. >>> record heat on the way. meteorologist anthony slaugter with the full forecast including when 90 degree weather could hit your neighborhood. "today in the
if he wants one? >> well, i trust what pete williams says on these things and there is a period of time, 36 to 48 hours. it's somewhat fudgible. it will defend when aware enough and coherent enough to begin to answer questions. but remember, the exception is about imminent threat. does he know of any other terrorist plots? has he planted any other devices? it's about the immediate safety and security of american citizens. and once law enforcement has concluded that is not an issue anymore based on his questions, they'll then move on to what will be the traditional questioning and interrogation within the constructs of the civilian law system. >> that's to figure out what went down in all this, but how do investigators begin determining whether or not they were part of a larger terrorist organization? >> well, as we've heard earlier, the high value interrogation group is comprised of an interagency group of individuals with tremendous experience in interrogating and questioning individuals like tsarnaev who is in custody right now. they will begin that process. they'll certainly find oth
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)